eBay Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

ebay-logo

eBay Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

(1) WebSite:
ebay.com



“eBay Inc. (stylized as ebay, formerly eBay) is an American multinational corporation and e-commerce company, providing consumer to consumer & business to consumer sales services via Internet. It is headquartered in San Jose, California. eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar in 1995, and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, it is a multi-billion dollar business with operations localized in over thirty countries.

 

The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a broad variety of goods and services worldwide. In addition to its auction-style sales, the website has since expanded to include “Buy It Now” shopping; shopping by UPC, ISBN, or other kind of SKU (via Half.com); online classified advertisements (via Kijiji or eBay Classifieds); online event ticket trading (via StubHub); online money transfers (via PayPal) and other services.” (Wikipedia)

 



(2) Vulnerability Description:

eBay web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “ebay.com/rover” page with “&mpre” parameter, i.e.

http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-67261-24966-0/2?mtid=691&kwid=1&crlp=1_263602&itemid=370825182102&mpre=http://www.google.com

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (26.0) in Ubuntu (12.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.


 

 

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from eBay to another site, eBay will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in eBay’s whitelist, e.g.
google.com

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from eBay to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from eBay directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
http://googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad system)

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

Poc Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4H-u17Y9ks

 

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/ebay-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



 

 



(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

The Weather Channel at Least 76.3% Links Vulnerable to XSS Attacks

 
 

GTY_email_hacker_dm_130718_16x9_608

 

The Weather Channel at Least 76.3% Links Vulnerable to XSS Attacks

 

 

Domain Description:
http://www.weather.com/

 

“The Weather Channel is an American basic cable and satellite television channel which broadcasts weather forecasts and weather-related news and analyses, along with documentaries and entertainment programming related to weather. Launched on May 2, 1982, the channel broadcasts weather forecasts and weather-related news and analysis, along with documentaries and entertainment programming related to weather.”

 

“As of February 2015, The Weather Channel was received by approximately 97.3 million American households that subscribe to a pay television service (83.6% of U.S. households with at least one television set), which gave it the highest national distribution of any U.S. cable channel. However, it was subsequently dropped by Verizon FiOS (losing its approximately 5.5 millions subscribers), giving the title of most distributed network to HLN. Actual viewership of the channel averaged 210,000 during 2013 and has been declining for several years. Content from The Weather Channel is available for purchase from the NBCUniversal Archives.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

Vulnerability description:


The Weather Channel has a cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by XSS bugs.

 

Almost all links under the domain weather.com are vulnerable to XSS attacks. Attackers just need to add script at the end of The Weather Channel’s URLs. Then the scripts will be executed.

 

10 thousands of Links were tested based a self-written tool. During the tests, 76.3% of links belong to weather.com were vulnerable to XSS attacks.

 

The reason of this vulnerability is that Weather Channel uses URLs to construct its HTML tags without filtering malicious script codes.

 

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 8.

 

 

 

 

weather_1_xss

 
 

weather_2_xx

 

 

POC Codes, e.g.

http://www.weather.com/slideshows/main/“–/>”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.weather.com/home-garden/home/white-house-lawns-20140316%22–/“–/>”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>t%28%27justqdjing%27%29%3E

http://www.weather.com/news/main/“><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

 

 

The Weather Channel has patched this Vulnerability in late November, 2014 (last Week). “The Full Disclosure mailing list is a public forum for detailed discussion of vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques, as well as tools, papers, news, and events of interest to the community. FD differs from other security lists in its open nature and support for researchers’ right to decide how to disclose their own discovered bugs. The full disclosure movement has been credited with forcing vendors to better secure their products and to publicly acknowledge and fix flaws rather than hide them. Vendor legal intimidation and censorship attempts are not tolerated here!” A great many of the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. This bug was published at The Full Disclosure in November, 2014.

 

 

 

Discovered by:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/89
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2014/11/27/3
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1253
https://progressive-comp.com/?l=full-disclosure&m=141705578527909&w=1
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/104313615841/the-weather-channel-flaw
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/xss-vulnerability/the-weather-channel-exploit
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/the-weather-channel-bug
http://whitehatpost.lofter.com/post/1cc773c8_6f2d4a8
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-weather-channel-flaw
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/234603051201411475314523/
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-weather-channel-xss.html
http://ithut.tumblr.com/post/121916595448/weather-channel-xss
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-weather-channel-weather-bug
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-weather-channel-xss.html
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/xss-vulnerability/the-weather-channel-bug

 

 

 

CVE-2014-8753 Cit-e-Net Multiple XSS (Cross-Site Scripting) Web Security Vulnerabilities

18638880
 

CVE-2014-8753 Cit-e-Net Multiple XSS (Cross-Site Scripting) Web Security Vulnerabilities

Exploit Title: Cit-e-Net Multiple XSS (Cross-Site Scripting) Web Security Vulnerabilities

Product: Cit-e-Access

Vendor: Cit-e-Net

Vulnerable Versions: Version 6

Tested Version: Version 6

Advisory Publication: February 12, 2015

Latest Update: June 01, 2015

Vulnerability Type: Cross-Site Scripting [CWE-79]

CVE Reference: CVE-2014-8753

Impact CVSS Severity (version 2.0):

CVSS v2 Base Score: 4.3 (MEDIUM) (AV:N/AC:M/Au:N/C:N/I:P/A:N) (legend)

Impact Subscore: 2.9

Exploitability Subscore: 8.6

CVSS Version 2 Metrics:

Access Vector: Network exploitable; Victim must voluntarily interact with attack mechanism

Access Complexity: Medium

Authentication: Not required to exploit

Impact Type: Allows unauthorized modification

Discover and Author: Jing Wang [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore] (@justqdjing)

 

 

Instruction Details:

(1) Vendor & Product Description:




Vendor:

Cit-e-Net

 

 

Product & Version:

Cit-e-Access

Version 6

 

 

Vendor URL & Download:

Cit-e-Net can be downloaded from here,

 

 

Product Introduction:

“We are a premier provider of Internet-based solutions encompassing web site development and modular interactive e-government applications which bring local government, residents and community businesses together.

Cit-e-Net provides a suite of on-line interactive services to counties, municipalities, and other government agencies, that they in turn can offer to their constituents. The municipal government achieves a greater degree of efficiency and timeliness in conducting the daily operations of government, while residents receive improved and easier access to city hall through the on-line access to government services.


Our web-based applications can help your municipality to acheive its e-government goals. Type & click website content-management empowers the municipality to manage the website quickly and easily. Web page styles & formats are customizable by the municipality, and because the foundation is a database application, user security can be set for individual personnel and module applications. Our application modules can either be integrated into your existing municipal web site or implemented as a complete web site solution. It’s your choice! Please contact us at info@cit-e.net to view a demonstration of our municipal web site solution if you are an elected official or member of municipal management and your municipality is looking for a cost efficient method for enhancing & improving municipal services.


Interactive Applications

Online Service Requests

Online Tax Payments by ACH electronic-check or credit card.

Online Utility Payments by ACH electronic-check or credit card.

Online General-Payments by ACH electronic-check or credit card.

Submit Volunteer Resume’s Online for the municipality to match your skills with available openings.”

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Details:

Cit-e-Access web application has a security bug problem. It can be exploited by XSS attacks. This may allow a remote attacker to create a specially crafted request that would execute arbitrary script code in a user’s browser session within the trust relationship between their browser and the server.

Several similar products 0Day vulnerabilities have been found by some other bug hunter researchers before. Cit-i-Access has patched some of them. Open Sourced Vulnerability Database (OSVDB) is an independent and open-sourced database. The goal of the project is to provide accurate, detailed, current, and unbiased technical information on security vulnerabilities. The project promotes greater, open collaboration between companies and individuals. It has published suggestions, advisories, solutions details related to important vulnerabilities.

 

 

(2.1) The first programming code flaw occurs at “/eventscalendar/index.cfm?” page with “&DID” parameter in HTTP GET.

(2.2) The second programming code flaw occurs at “/search/index.cfm?” page with “&keyword” parameter in HTTP POST.

(2.3) The third programming code flaw occurs at “/news/index.cfm” page with “&jump2” “&DID” parameter in HTTP GET.

(2.4) The fourth programming code flaw occurs at “eventscalendar?” page with “&TPID” parameter in HTTP GET.

(2.5) The fifth programming code flaw occurs at “/meetings/index.cfm?” page with “&DID” parameter in HTTP GET.

 

 

 

 

(3) Solutions:

Leave message to vendor. No response.
http://www.cit-e.net/contact.cfm

 

 

 

 

 

References:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2015/Feb/48
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2015/02/13/2
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1587
https://www.mail-archive.com/fulldisclosure%40seclists.org/msg01683.html
https://computerpitch.wordpress.com/2015/06/07/cve-2014-8753/
http://webtechhut.blogspot.com/2015/06/cve-2014-8753.html
https://www.facebook.com/websecuritiesnews/posts/804176613035844
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/607381197077946368
http://biboying.lofter.com/post/1cc9f4f5_7356826
http://shellmantis.tumblr.com/post/120903342496/securitypost-cve-2014-8753
http://itprompt.blogspot.com/2015/06/cve-2014-8753.html
http://whitehatpost.blog.163.com/blog/static/24223205420155710559404/
https://plus.google.com/u/0/113115469311022848114/posts/FomMK9BGGx2
https://www.facebook.com/pcwebsecurities/posts/702290949916825
http://securitypost.tumblr.com/post/120903225352/cve-2014-8753-cit-e-net
http://webtech.lofter.com/post/1cd3e0d3_7355910
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/cves/cve-2014-8753/
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/cve-2014-8753/

 

 

 

Facebook Old Generated URLs Still Vulnerable to Open Redirect Attacks & A New Open Redirect Web Security Bugs

pentest


Facebook Old Generated URLs Still Vulnerable to Open Redirect Attacks & A New Open Redirect Web Security Bugs




Domain:
http://www.facebook.com



“Facebook is an online social networking service headquartered in Menlo Park, California. Its website was launched on February 4, 2004, by Mark Zuckerberg with his college roommates and fellow Harvard University students Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz and Chris Hughes. The founders had initially limited the website’s membership to Harvard students, but later expanded it to colleges in the Boston area, the Ivy League, and Stanford University. It gradually added support for students at various other universities and later to high-school students. Since 2006, anyone who is at least 13 years old is allowed to become a registered user of the website, though the age requirement may be higher depending on applicable local laws. Its name comes from a colloquialism for the directory given to it by American universities students.” (Wikipedia)



“Facebook had over 1.44 billion monthly active users as of March 2015.Because of the large volume of data users submit to the service, Facebook has come under scrutiny for their privacy policies. Facebook, Inc. held its initial public offering in February 2012 and began selling stock to the public three months later, reaching an original peak market capitalization of $104 billion. As of February 2015 Facebook reached a market capitalization of $212 Billion.” (Wikipedia)





Discover:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/

 



(1) General Vulnerabilities Description:

(1.1) Two Facebook vulnerabilities are introduced in this article.

Facebook has a computer cyber security bug problem. It can be exploited by Open Redirect attacks. This could allow a user to create a specially crafted URL, that if clicked, would redirect a victim from the intended legitimate web site to an arbitrary web site of the attacker’s choosing. Such attacks are useful as the crafted URL initially appear to be a web page of a trusted site. This could be leveraged to direct an unsuspecting user to a web page containing attacks that target client side software such as a web browser or document rendering programs.


Since Facebook is trusted by large numbers of other websites. Those vulnerabilities can be used to do “Covert Redirect” to other websites such as Amazon, eBay, Go-daddy, Yahoo, 163, Mail.ru etc.

 

(1.1.1)

One Facebook Open Redirect vulnerability was reported to Facebook. Facebook adopted a new mechanism to patch it. Though the reported URL redirection vulnerabilities are patched. However, all old generated URLs are still vulnerable to the attacks. Section (2) gives detail of it.

The reason may be related to Facebook’s third-party interaction system or database management system or both. Another reason may be related to Facebook’s design for different kind of browsers.

 

(1.1.2) Another new Open Redirect vulnerability related to Facebook is introduced, too. For reference, please read section (3).

The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on IE (9.0) of Windows 8, Firefox (24.0) & Google Chromium 30.0.1599.114 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (12.10),Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.



(1.2) Facebook’s URL Redirection System Related to “*.php” Files

All URLs’ redirection are based on several files, such l.php, a.php, landing.php and so on.

The main redirection are based on file “l.php” (Almost all redirection links are using it right now).

For file “l.php”, one parameter “h” is used for authentication. When it mentions to file “a.php”, parameter “eid” is used for authentication. All those two files use parameter “u” for the url redirected to. In some other files such as “landing.php”, parameters such as “url”, “next” are used.

<1>For parameter “h”, two forms of authentication are used.

<a>h=HAQHyinFq

<b>h=hAQHalW1CAQHrkVIQNNqgwhxRWLNsFVeH3auuImlbR1CgKA

<2>For parameter “eid”, one form of authentication is used.

<a>eid=AQLP8sRq6lbU0jz0lARx9A9uetB6FIF1N2-Yjj_ePj0d_ezubjstZeDo6qDsalKVJwy6uDb_hQ-9tBsA2dVoQRq0lniOu0os_gPe3gY5l8lYblhQSwBtdvgjXjNqaxLZMYoasr3vv46tFsh1fL7q4kjT2LFw52dnJWd4SE8qc0YuPWfgPeQywgM2wl0CoW-lftWkr2dX0dLcytyHjXnvhKfVS_pQBllszUzsPENxE6EuZ-53Lh188o56idnfyyk2L58pE7C94PF-za4ZVB0qbuA2EnPcSJI-7oIiIJmIhifHe0CYTzG512-Z_heN44VlyJHevhS9auAR8-lFCAIlYymnT_Qiwp92RxjNOfBypBvszQUrvB6PH3fANn1prfMBVm4RD_GFel14KVDS5USswbTOTkL3sZNhHUqqPHwBwU3JFePMMuwsfesigH85B_AxCsXUIWN7klKGSq8bPPsKSHttsa9hkkMpSfRKL7D_xwW4dU2xlmfGWil7jYRJmwfbOeF0zujk1FRBuM757tbfFMav-J-K9npbdrDrCuUVqV__Tf7CGZ89nPl-M2d09pE9enJj0OBXOaSXZX16LKaYnv1Wh4GKme7C-EOunITxyQtp1zy-48Uaz9mxO2x4bw7sBDfzDStF_Al8_0SMjWNTh-J38rBHAgT96X-dPFI43HU3x3fVymE9szrclBpvTaSfYezatgMzf77s3lQrQAMSlwSSRIzRuoFvQBmWKT0T5ZFgH5ykhYKhNMiKj577UO5g2Ojm-_-KKF4N_DBuG5R-I6EOSlhok2xUkpKVDnDcxZFTLxGmx5xc56J5kZLjJ96wnF2fH09Q19Qc2aU3xYFlEFrKjrlLpwGyOyCDx7_z7y1O4Efqew3Fa0Cb9s6Kk2jpLF5XEIaYzzXOLAffxXG6icBJVovb9RPmiZ5s9dKYYotLol68_X04O05bEvVccPEh-IQwX_VTMt3f23be2MECEqR2l1A1ZkJx4qP00GI1pZhU_CXAnjSaTNmtaINRUeSsLNEZZsPwpWJMfeeGSwuof9krC05eSWjO0jH9tua0KteMYhj8i-3dwSBp4f7nMcFwH5ltfCLhMCYNB8rxgzcAczyhLIo2UY-3FSaJXBZ0lvuZBvnj7myUnyc2lCcy-fWh93MRRaJrrinjtfr9fDSMHM9Cja5xi0eG3Vs0aClnWbeJZA79TvmYt7E53HfwGuv5-EJOqRh3cwZF-53uPHA73ikUk3xTApjQunJM4uIBhpy7iBIgn_OXXo3X03YUJtJcDuC20ocJbZ310VHliox5tYZF2oiMaOfgo9Y9KeqgsrJgwPCJeif4aB0Ne4g_oM_Tuqt2pXbdgoCawHIApF087eFKJqejp0jpEkJerXPyK-IqsD_SQfIm_2WJSkzwzATwQKs

 

 

 


(2) Vulnerability Description 1:

(2.1) A security researcher reported two Open Redirect vulnerabilities to Facebook in 2013. The following are the two links reported.

Though a new mechanism was adopted. However, all old generated redirections still work by parameter “h” and “eid”.

 

 

(2.2) A website was used for the following tests. The website is “http://www.tetraph.com/“. Suppose this website is malicious.

(2.2.1)

<1>First test

<a>file: “l.php”

<b>URL parameter: “u”

<c>authentication parameter: “h”

<d>form: “h=HAQHyinFq”.

<e>The authentication has no relation with all other parameters, such as “s”.

Examples:

URL 1:

Redirect Forbidden:

Redirect Works:

 

URL 2:

Redirect Forbidden:

Redirect Works:

 

 

(2.2.2)

<2>Second test. It is the same situation as above.

<a>file: “l.php”,

<b>url parameter “u”

<c>authentication parameter: “h”

<d>form: “h=hAQHalW1CAQHrkVIQNNqgwhxRWLNsFVeH3auuImlbR1CgKA”.

<e>The authentication has no relation to all other parameters, such as “env”, “s”.

 

Examples:

URL 1:

Redirect Forbidden:

 

URL 2:

Redirect Forbidden:

Redirect Works:

 

 

 

(3) Facebook File “a.php” Open Redirect Security Vulnerability

 

(3.1)

<a>file: “a.php”

<b>parameter “u”

<c> authentication parameter: “eid”

<d> form: “eid=5967147530925355409.6013336879369.AQKBG5nt468YgKeiSdgExZQRjwGb9r6EOu-Uc5WPvi-EVHEzadq8YSrgSvUzbMmxKPPfTgM-JrPff7tN38luc-8h16lxL0Gj_4qs1-58yWgXirMH4AEf8sOEsZc5DTx7yFndgODvD5NrC-314BIj4pZvMhlljXv89lHRH6pBgyGGVm-oWBDIF8CuRER1f5ZGbKdsiUcBISdWTninVzvBdW1mZY0SWzqT21fZmhgVKtdkRf5l_pag7hAmotFK9HI5XHfGicWVqzRyTNiDIYjyVjTv4km2FOEp7WP3w65aVUKP_w”.

<e>The authentication has no relation to all other parameters, such as “mac”, “_tn_”.

Examples:

Vulnerable URL:

https://www.facebook.com/a.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Ffb-nym.adnxs.com%2Ffclick%3Fclickenc%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fbs.serving-sys.com%252FBurstingPipe%252FadServer.bs%253Fcn%253Dtf%2526c%253D20%2526mc%253Dclick%2526pli%253D8782431%2526PluID%253D0%2526ord%253D%257BCACHEBUSTER%257D%26cp%3D%253Fdi%253DzGxX6INl-T9QvRSibN_3P5qZmZmZmfk_UL0Uomzf9z_ObFfog2X5P_WPPCuD-to_CKEeLew3cQIQkc9SAAAAAHQcDQB2BQAAKAcAAAIAAAD4iq8AanMCAAAAAQBVU0QAVVNEAGMASABq4DoFka4BAgUCAQUAAIgAkinLswAAAAA.%252Fcnd%253D%252521qQYdPgjeqqYBEPiVvgUY6uYJIAA.%252Freferrer%253Dfacebook.com%252F&mac=AQJllyaGzLYoRoQz&__tn__=%2AB&eid=5967147530925355409.6013336879369.AQKBG5nt468YgKeiSdgExZQRjwGb9r6EOu-Uc5WPvi-EVHEzadq8YSrgSvUzbMmxKPPfTgM-JrPff7tN38luc-8h16lxL0Gj_4qs1-58yWgXirMH4AEf8sOEsZc5DTx7yFndgODvD5NrC-314BIj4pZvMhlljXv89lHRH6pBgyGGVm-oWBDIF8CuRER1f5ZGbKdsiUcBISdWTninVzvBdW1mZY0SWzqT21fZmhgVKtdkRf5l_pag7hAmotFK9HI5XHfGicWVqzRyTNiDIYjyVjTv4km2FOEp7WP3w65aVUKP_w

POC:

 

(3.2) Facebook Login Page Covert Redirect Security Vulnerability

Vulnerable URL Related to Login.php Based on a.php:

https://www.facebook.com/login.php?next=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fa.php%3Fu%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.rp.edu.sg%252Fopenhouse2014%252F%253Futm_source%253Dfacebook%2526utm_medium%253Dcpc%2526utm_campaign%253Dopenhouse2014%26mac%3DAQKyRHClixA20iGL%26__tn__%3D%252AB%26eid%3DAQLAHC7szSXhT3FaEBXe5YFsOC0kEM4nN9PlVovdilvuzROStFXoYqptlKpcJAzHNTLpxWAIrmJYsR6RVG_Htk6pgT7Iol6lWHDJvn7Cg5sqigvE_eVS895Eh6fSwxH3fgfWcNDrEl5_lFgRbrJtC71R68rW_VXS9QCN7Po9wTWDnbyZTaXawdrdQyibryvA56Spr5GcUDUboRFxy8YSr2ahUV_goDAQA3OKmCACEn8CmyMrOT5gZq3iwusysdchRxLIv5N82-GMTiDxXXgkDYf1P7XwvklWpfy_cEItZzV5v0P7fRZB3qiq_RDx9jhEzndlJhUJL2aWE0ldPmGKGz9xWyvPaPLOwzBo23GQbpj2ZN_tw9B9tz2l3tGIN1yegd_Wf6PSFIZOuBXfZILvmILcxg3qz4dHx1fmgPZBpf_34mPnMEkgZqbT2WeV_GZKz8RDIg88D3vrmwyMwWxeh3xyGuddjZUjOUjPCUwrgSrWZK3XHRA7TA7tWIsQ4X1bsjx9c72mm8bZmmRBRJwqOcjsW0QEVETs_Cs9pS9QBkgX8yVPJCHuk1v_xkj4EHHH9sNP7a4GRs8olklBTKhCcJ908sVrQVT2I-cQYw2SVU9hWaWWjX2AGt3WpdT2kx6SIPoPQpX5cIC4Lcfaa7EcZFBnoQPv3mR5BNHRFTh_6Qvr01BrCG3Fv5VeDeXhM8cHk6VuBtj5smz0ZeGT5JWvub5ORJ4xzVN0zAW8V4qiKiVFKTEFMZASaZFon41VFCbhxkX0Bi62Ko64PY6uP64tCMWh6yX2o0JMc0mJWFJRp1695OCKgLXf0udRyWDESTyYgJXIlxecCmlwCEbleAsE-wtDXNOfDTXOzApr1sZO_58FBRaw-K4Z2VRXLir5mrdXTKnM1Y4rDDqGZur9G7LfuXrCr5oR1J5LJ8sVupHqsiN7-UqdakiEEIBq750KxVjaAdCyqJp_5EJ-yVMK3f2pMX7cQ2Lw6u434hHimuLN9VDPLkpSiMlPOa8RkarDSred73IfQiv-PluegYDfunZFxj1KvcAlzhVZsL-a52hJmXrOrzKuV0hyZaBLtAIo6AEoXXV30D-6iraSUphkOFzYt3ah6oRrmXLQZKm2E8Cuag5d_rAnwvIr98dn4OSa8Z4MCZemI3uH8cjxr86aE046uTA_Hm1GjYM5l7wkpHknHI8QR2q5Cioo2h6WiUO-jsIFkQ4XFgAd5IUCcAbQukXdC4GJzl18iaN8wkylsTk8aVBn6G1xZadSL0b5R3NgsYfQUVtV0g9slnOLNkgq0NLMAk0kWFs

POC:

https://www.facebook.com/login.php?next=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fa.php%3Fu%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.stackoverflow.com%26mac%3DAQKyRHClixA20iGL%26__tn__%3D%252AB%26eid%3DAQLAHC7szSXhT3FaEBXe5YFsOC0kEM4nN9PlVovdilvuzROStFXoYqptlKpcJAzHNTLpxWAIrmJYsR6RVG_Htk6pgT7Iol6lWHDJvn7Cg5sqigvE_eVS895Eh6fSwxH3fgfWcNDrEl5_lFgRbrJtC71R68rW_VXS9QCN7Po9wTWDnbyZTaXawdrdQyibryvA56Spr5GcUDUboRFxy8YSr2ahUV_goDAQA3OKmCACEn8CmyMrOT5gZq3iwusysdchRxLIv5N82-GMTiDxXXgkDYf1P7XwvklWpfy_cEItZzV5v0P7fRZB3qiq_RDx9jhEzndlJhUJL2aWE0ldPmGKGz9xWyvPaPLOwzBo23GQbpj2ZN_tw9B9tz2l3tGIN1yegd_Wf6PSFIZOuBXfZILvmILcxg3qz4dHx1fmgPZBpf_34mPnMEkgZqbT2WeV_GZKz8RDIg88D3vrmwyMwWxeh3xyGuddjZUjOUjPCUwrgSrWZK3XHRA7TA7tWIsQ4X1bsjx9c72mm8bZmmRBRJwqOcjsW0QEVETs_Cs9pS9QBkgX8yVPJCHuk1v_xkj4EHHH9sNP7a4GRs8olklBTKhCcJ908sVrQVT2I-cQYw2SVU9hWaWWjX2AGt3WpdT2kx6SIPoPQpX5cIC4Lcfaa7EcZFBnoQPv3mR5BNHRFTh_6Qvr01BrCG3Fv5VeDeXhM8cHk6VuBtj5smz0ZeGT5JWvub5ORJ4xzVN0zAW8V4qiKiVFKTEFMZASaZFon41VFCbhxkX0Bi62Ko64PY6uP64tCMWh6yX2o0JMc0mJWFJRp1695OCKgLXf0udRyWDESTyYgJXIlxecCmlwCEbleAsE-wtDXNOfDTXOzApr1sZO_58FBRaw-K4Z2VRXLir5mrdXTKnM1Y4rDDqGZur9G7LfuXrCr5oR1J5LJ8sVupHqsiN7-UqdakiEEIBq750KxVjaAdCyqJp_5EJ-yVMK3f2pMX7cQ2Lw6u434hHimuLN9VDPLkpSiMlPOa8RkarDSred73IfQiv-PluegYDfunZFxj1KvcAlzhVZsL-a52hJmXrOrzKuV0hyZaBLtAIo6AEoXXV30D-6iraSUphkOFzYt3ah6oRrmXLQZKm2E8Cuag5d_rAnwvIr98dn4OSa8Z4MCZemI3uH8cjxr86aE046uTA_Hm1GjYM5l7wkpHknHI8QR2q5Cioo2h6WiUO-jsIFkQ4XFgAd5IUCcAbQukXdC4GJzl18iaN8wkylsTk8aVBn6G1xZadSL0b5R3NgsYfQUVtV0g9slnOLNkgq0NLMAk0kWFs





Those vulnerabilities were reported to Facebook in 2014 and they have been patched.





Several other similar products 0-day vulnerabilities have been found by some other bug hunter researchers before. Facebook has patched some of them. “The Full Disclosure mailing list is a public forum for detailed discussion of vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques, as well as tools, papers, news, and events of interest to the community. FD differs from other security lists in its open nature and support for researchers’ right to decide how to disclose their own discovered bugs. The full disclosure movement has been credited with forcing vendors to better secure their products and to publicly acknowledge and fix flaws rather than hide them. Vendor legal intimidation and censorship attempts are not tolerated here!” All the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. Large number of Facebook bugs were published here. FD also publishes suggestions, advisories, solutions details related to Open Redirect vulnerabilities and cyber intelligence recommendations.








(4) Amazon Covert Redirect Security Vulnerability Based on Facebook

Since Facebook is trusted by large numbers of other websites. Those vulnerabilities can be used to do “Covert Redirect” to other websites such as Amazon.


Domain:
http://www.amazon.com


“American electronic commerce company with headquarters in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest Internet-based retailer in the United States. Amazon.com started as an online bookstore, but soon diversified, selling DVDs, Blu-rays, CDs, video downloads/streaming, MP3 downloads/streaming, software, video games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys and jewelry. The company also produces consumer electronics—notably, Amazon Kindle e-book readers, Fire tablets, Fire TV and Fire Phone — and is a major provider of cloud computing services. Amazon also sells certain low-end products like USB cables under its inhouse brand AmazonBasics. Amazon has separate retail websites for United States, United Kingdom & Ireland, France, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Australia, Brazil, Japan, China, India and Mexico. Amazon also offers international shipping to certain other countries for some of its products. In 2011, it had professed an intention to launch its websites in Poland and Sweden.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

The vulnerability exists at “redirect.html?” page with “&location” parameter, e.g.

 

(4.1) When a user is redirected from Amazon to another site, Amazon will check parameters “&token”. If the redirected URL’s domain is OK, Amazon will allow the reidrection.

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Amazon to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Amazon directly.

One of the vulnerable domain is,
http://www.facebook.com

 

(4.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope“. Suppose it is malicious.

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

 

 

 

Related Articles:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2015/Jan/22
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1428
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2015/01/12/1
http://marc.info/?l=full-disclosure&m=142104333521454&w=4
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/facebook-open-redirect/
https://www.facebook.com/essaybeans/posts/570476126427191
http://germancast.blogspot.de/2015/06/facebook-web-security-0day-bug.html
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2015/01/11/facebook-open-redirect/
http://essaybeans.lofter.com/post/1cc77d20_7300027
http://qianqiuxue.tumblr.com/post/120750458855/itinfotech-facebook-web-security-0day-bug
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=472994806188548&id=405943696226993
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2015/01/11/facebook-open-redirect/
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/phishing/facebook-open-redirect/
http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/post/120750347586/facebook-web-security-0day-bug
http://ittechnology.lofter.com/post/1cfbf60d_72fd108
http://russiapost.blogspot.ru/2015/06/facebook-web-security-0day-bug.html
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/606676645265567744
https://plus.google.com/u/0/110001022997295385049/posts/hb6seddG561
http://whitehatpost.blog.163.com/blog/static/24223205420155501020837/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-security/facebook-open-redirect/







CNN Travel.cnn.com XSS and Ads.cnn.com Open Redirect Web Security Vulnerabilities

new-type-of-phishing-attack-goes-after-your-browser-tabs-86b683f537

 

CNN Travel.cnn.com XSS and Ads.cnn.com Open Redirect Web Security Vulnerabilities

 

Domain:
http://cnn.com

 

“The Cable News Network (CNN) is an American basic cable and satellite television channel that is owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. The 24-hour cable news channel was founded in 1980 by American media proprietor Ted Turner. Upon its launch, CNN was the first television channel to provide 24-hour news coverage, and was the first all-news television channel in the United States. While the news channel has numerous affiliates, CNN primarily broadcasts from the Time Warner Center in New York City, and studios in Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles, its headquarters at the CNN Center in Atlanta is only used for weekend programming. CNN is sometimes referred to as CNN/U.S. to distinguish the American channel from its international sister network, CNN International. As of August 2010, CNN is available in over 100 million U.S. households. Broadcast coverage of the U.S. channel extends to over 890,000 American hotel rooms, as well as carriage on cable and satellite providers throughout Canada. Globally, CNN programming airs through CNN International, which can be seen by viewers in over 212 countries and territories. As of February 2015, CNN is available to approximately 96,289,000 cable, satellite and, telco television households (82.7% of households with at least one television set) in the United States.” (Wikipedia)

 

Discovered and Reported by:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/

 

 

Vulnerability Description:
CNN has a cyber security bug problem. It cab be exploited by XSS (Cross Site Scripting) and Open Redirect (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards) attacks.

 

Based on news published, CNN users were hacked based on both Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities.

 

According to E Hacker News on June 06, 2013, (@BreakTheSec) came across a diet spam campaign that leverages the open redirect vulnerability in one of the top News organization CNN.

 

After the attack, CNN takes measures to detect Open Redirect vulnerabilities. The measure is quite good during the tests. Almost no links are vulnerable to Open Redirect attack on CNN’s website, now. It takes long time to find a new Open Redirect vulnerability that is un-patched on its website.

 

CNN.com was hacked by Open Redirect in 2013. While the XSS attacks happened in 2007.

 

 

<1> “The tweet apparently shows cyber criminals managed to leverage the open redirect security flaw in the CNN to redirect twitter users to the Diet spam websites.”

 

cnn_open_redirect_complain_meitu_1

Figure from ehackingnews.com

 

At the same time, the cybercriminals have also leveraged a similar vulnerability in a Yahoo domain to trick users into thinking that the links point to a trusted website.

 

Several other similar products 0-day vulnerabilities have been found by some other bug hunter researchers before. CNN has patched some of them. BugTraq is a full disclosure moderated mailing list for the *detailed* discussion and announcement of computer security vulnerabilities: what they are, how to exploit them, and how to fix them. The below things be posted to the Bugtraq list: (a) Information on computer or network related security vulnerabilities (UNIX, Windows NT, or any other). (b) Exploit programs, scripts or detailed processes about the above. (c) Patches, workarounds, fixes. (d) Announcements, advisories or warnings. (e) Ideas, future plans or current works dealing with computer/network security. (f) Information material regarding vendor contacts and procedures. (g) Individual experiences in dealing with above vendors or security organizations. (h) Incident advisories or informational reporting. (i) New or updated security tools. A large number of the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. It also publishes suggestions, advisories, solutions details related to XSS and URL Redirection vulnerabilities and cyber intelligence recommendations.

 

 

(1) CNN (cnn.com) Travel-City Related Links XSS (cross site scripting) Web Security Bugs

 

Domain:
travel.cnn.com/

 

Vulnerability Description:
The programming bug flaws occur at “/city/all” pages. All links under this URL are vulnerable to XSS attacks, e.g

 

XSS may allow a remote attacker to create a specially crafted request that would execute arbitrary script code in a user’s browser session within the trust relationship between their browser and the server. Base on Acunetix, exploited XSS is commonly used to achieve the following malicious results

  • Identity theft
  • Accessing sensitive or restricted information
  • Gaining free access to otherwise paid for content
  • Spying on user’s web browsing habits
  • Altering browser functionality
  • Public defamation of an individual or corporation
  • Web application defacement
  • Denial of Service attacks

 

The code programming flaw can be exploited without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.

 

cnn_travel_xss

 

PoC:

http://travel.cnn.com/city/all/all/tokyo/all‘ /”><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

http://travel.cnn.com/city/all/all/bangkok/all‘ /”><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

 

 

(2) CNN cnn.com ADS Open Redirect Web Security Bug

 

Domain:
ads.cnn.com

 

Vulnerability Description:
The programming code flaw occurs at “event.ng” page with “&Redirect” parameter, i.e.

 

From OWASP, an open redirect is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without any validation. This vulnerability is used in phishing attacks to get users to visit malicious sites without realizing it. This could allow a user to create a specially crafted URL, that if clicked, would redirect a victim from the intended legitimate web site to an arbitrary web site of the attacker’s choosing. Such attacks are useful as the crafted URL initially appear to be a web page of a trusted site. This could be leveraged to direct an unsuspecting user to a web page containing attacks that target client side software such as a web browser or document rendering programs.

 

The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

 

(2.1) Use the following tests to illustrate the scenario painted above.

 

The redirected webpage address is “http://webcabinet.tumblr.com/“. Suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

Since CNN is well-known worldwide, this vulnerability can be used to do “Covert Redirect” attacks to other websites.

 

Those vulnerabilities were reported to CNN in early July by Contact from Here. But they are still not been patched yet.
http://edition.cnn.com/feedback/#cnn_FBKCNN_com

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Dec/128
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2014/12/29/6
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1395
http://static-173-79-223-25.washdc.fios.verizon.net/?l=full-disclosure
http://securitypost.tumblr.com/post/107868680057/ithut-cnn-cnn-com-travel
http://ittechnology.lofter.com/post/1cfbf60d_5500df0
http://ithut.tumblr.com/post/120833062743/cnn-xss-url-redirection-bug
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/it-news/cnn-xss-url-redirect-bug/
https://biyiniao.wordpress.com/2015/01/08/cnn-xss-open-redirect-bug/
http://whitehatpost.blog.163.com/blog/static/24223205420155613753998/
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+wangfeiblackcookie/posts/bFkukxiUfXK
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=674936469318135
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2015/06/cnn-xss-redirect-bug.html
http://diebiyi.com/articles/news/cnn-xss-url-redirect-bug/
https://twitter.com/yangziyou/status/607060937309159425
https://redysnowfox.wordpress.com/2014/12/31/cnn-xss-url-redirect-bug/
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1043534509019886
http://whitehatpost.lofter.com/post/1cc773c8_7338196
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/12/cnn-cnncom-travel-xss-and

Google DoubleClicK System Bugs Could Be Used by Spammers

887

 

Google DoubleClick.net (Advertising) System URL Redirection Vulnerabilities Could Be Used by Spammers

 

Although Google does not include Open Redirect vulnerabilities in its bug bounty program, its preventive measures against Open Redirect attacks have been quite thorough and effective to date.

 

However, Google might have overlooked the security of its DoubleClick.net ​advertising system. After some test, it is found that most of the redirection URLs within DoubleClick.net are vulnerable to Open Redirect vulnerabilities. Many redirection are likely to be affected. This could allow a user to create a specially crafted URL, that if clicked, would redirect a victim from the intended legitimate web site to an arbitrary web site of the attacker’s choosing. Such attacks are useful as the crafted URL initially appear to be a web page of a trusted site. This could be leveraged to direct an unsuspecting user to a web page containing attacks that target client side software such as a web browser or document rendering programs.

 

These redirections can be easily used by spammers, too.

 

Some URLs belong to Googleads.g.Doubleclick.net are vulnerable to Open Redirect attacks, too. While Google prevents similar URL redirections other than Googleads.g.Doubleclick.net. Attackers can use URLs related to Google Account to make the attacks more powerful.

 

Moreover, these vulnerabilities can be used to attack other companies such as Google, eBay, The New York Times, Amazon, Godaddy, Yahoo, Netease, e.g. by bypassing their Open Redirect filters (Covert Redirect). These cyber security security bug problems have not been patched. Other similar web and computer attacks will be published in the near future.

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/

 

 

 

(1) Background Related to Google DoubleClick.net.

(1.1) What is DoubleClick.net?

DoubleClick is a subsidiary of Google which develops and provides Internet ad serving services. Its clients include agencies, marketers (Universal McCann, AKQA etc.) and publishers who serve customers like Microsoft, General Motors, Coca-Cola, Motorola, L’Oréal, Palm, Inc., Apple Inc., Visa USA, Nike, Carlsberg among others. DoubleClick’s headquarters is in New York City, United States.

 

DoubleClick was founded in 1996 by Kevin O’Connor and Dwight Merriman. It was formerly listed as “DCLK” on the NASDAQ, and was purchased by private equity firms Hellman & Friedman and JMI Equity in July 2005. In March 2008, Google acquired DoubleClick for US$3.1 billion. Unlike many other dot-com companies, it survived the dot-com bubble and focuses on uploading ads and reporting their performance.” (Wikipedia)

 

(1.2) Reports Related to Google DoubleClick.net Used by Spammers

(1.2.1)

Google DoublClick.net has been used by spammers for long time. The following is a report in 2008.

 

“The open redirect had become popular with spammers trying to lure users into clicking their links, as they could be made to look like safe URLs within Google’s domain.”
https://www.virusbtn.com/blog/2008/06_03a.xml?comments

 

(1.2.2)

Mitechmate published a blog related to DoubleClick.net spams in 2014.

 

Ad.doubleclick.net is recognized as a perilous adware application that causes unwanted redirections when surfing on the certain webpages. Actually it is another browser hijacker that aims to distribute frauds to make money.Commonly people pick up Ad.doubleclick virus when download softwares, browse porn site or read spam email attachments. It enters into computer sneakily after using computer insecurely.Ad.doubleclick.net is not just annoying, this malware traces users’ personal information, which would be utilized for cyber criminal.”
http://blog.mitechmate.com/remove-ad-doubleclick-net-redirect-virus/

 

(1.2.3)

Malwarebytes posted a news related to DoubleClick.net malvertising in 2014.

 

 

(2) DoubleClick.net System URL Redirection Vulnerabilities Details.

The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

 

Used webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://securitypost.tumblr.com/“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

 

(2.1) Vulnerable URLs Related to Googleads.g.Doubleclick.net.

(2.1.1)

Some URLs belong to googleads.g.doubleclick.net are vulnerable to Open Redirect attacks. While Google prevents similar URL redirection other than googleads.g.doubleclick.net.

 

Vulnerable URLs:

 

POC:

 

Attackers can make use of the following URLs to make the attacks more powerful, i.e.

 

POC:

 

 

(2.1.2)

While Google prevents similar URL redirection other than googleads.g.doubleclick.net , e.g.

 

 

 

(2.2) Vulnerable URLs Related to DoubleClick.net.

Vulnerable URLs 1:

 

POC:

 

Vulnerable URLs 2:

 

POC:

 

Vulnerable URLs 3:

 

POC:

 

 

We can see that Google DoubleClick.net has Open Redirect vulnerabilities and could be misused by spammers.

 

 

 

(2.3)

 

Several other similar products 0-day vulnerabilities have been found by some other bug hunter researchers before. Google has patched some of them. BugTraq is a full disclosure moderated mailing list for the *detailed* discussion and announcement of computer security vulnerabilities: what they are, how to exploit them, and how to fix them. The below things be posted to the Bugtraq list: (a) Information on computer or network related security vulnerabilities (UNIX, Windows NT, or any other). (b) Exploit programs, scripts or detailed processes about the above. (c) Patches, workarounds, fixes. (d) Announcements, advisories or warnings. (e) Ideas, future plans or current works dealing with computer/network security. (f) Information material regarding vendor contacts and procedures. (g) Individual experiences in dealing with above vendors or security organizations. (h) Incident advisories or informational reporting. (i) New or updated security tools. A large number of the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. It also publishes suggestions, advisories, solutions details related to Open Redirect vulnerabilities and cyber intelligence recommendations.

 

 

 

(3) Google DoubleClick.net Can Adversely Affect Other Websites.

At the same time, Google DoubleClick.net can be used to do “Covert Redirect” to other websites, such as Google, eBay, The New York Times, etc.(Bypass other websites’ Open Redirect filters)

 

 

(3.1) Google Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

Domain:
google.com

 

“Google is an American multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software. Most of its profits are derived from AdWords, an online advertising service that places advertising near the list of search results. Google was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin while they were Ph.D. students at Stanford University. Together they own about 14 percent of its shares but control 56 percent of the stockholder voting power through supervoting stock. They incorporated Google as a privately held company on September 4, 1998. An initial public offering followed on August 19, 2004. Its mission statement from the outset was “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful,” and its unofficial slogan was “Don’t be evil”. In 2004, Google moved to its new headquarters in Mountain View, California, nicknamed the Googleplex. The corporation has been estimated to run more than one million servers in data centers around the world (as of 2007). It processes over one billion search requests and about 24 petabytes of user-generated data each day (as of 2009). In December 2013, Alexa listed google.com as the most visited website in the world. Numerous Google sites in other languages figure in the top one hundred, as do several other Google-owned sites such as YouTube and Blogger. Its market dominance has led to prominent media coverage, including criticism of the company over issues such as search neutrality, copyright, censorship, and privacy.” (Wikipedia)

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

More Details:

 

 

(3.2) eBay Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

Domain:
ebay.com

 

“eBay Inc. (stylized as ebay) is an American multinational corporation and e-commerce company, providing consumer to consumer & business to consumer sales services via Internet. It is headquartered in San Jose, California, United States. eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar in 1995, and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, it is a multi-billion dollar business with operations localized in over thirty countries. The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a broad variety of goods and services worldwide. In addition to its auction-style sales, the website has since expanded to include “Buy It Now” shopping; shopping by UPC, ISBN, or other kind of SKU (via Half.com); online classified advertisements (via Kijiji or eBay Classifieds); online event ticket trading (via StubHub); online money transfers (via PayPal) and other services. It is not a free website, but charges users an invoice fee when sellers have sold or listed any items.” (Wikipedia)

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

More Details:

 

 

(3.3) The New York Times (Nytimes.com) Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Google Doubleclick.net

Domain:
nytimes.com

 

“The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company. It has won 114 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. The paper’s print version has the largest circulation of any metropolitan newspaper in the United States, and the second-largest circulation overall, behind The Wall Street Journal. It is ranked 39th in the world by circulation. Following industry trends, its weekday circulation has fallen to fewer than one million daily since 1990. Nicknamed for years as “The Gray Lady”, The New York Times is long regarded within the industry as a national “newspaper of record”. It is owned by The New York Times Company. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., (whose family (Ochs-Sulzberger) has controlled the paper for five generations, since 1896), is both the paper’s publisher and the company’s chairman. Its international version, formerly the International Herald Tribune, is now called the International New York Times.” (Wikipedia)

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

More Details:

 

These vulnerabilities were reported to Google earlier in 2014. But it seems that Google has yet taken any actions. All of the vulnerabilities are still not patched.

 

 

 

 

Related Posts:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/28
https://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2014110106
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1192
https://www.mail-archive.com/fulldisclosure%40seclists.org/msg01307.html
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/11/google-doubleclicknetadvertising-system.html=
http://www.techenet.com/2014/12/doubleclick-do-google-pode-ser-vulneravel-a-ataques/
https://computertechhut.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/google-doubleclick-spam/
http://mathpost.tumblr.com/post/120760828940/tetraph-google-doubleclick-net-advertising
http://tetraph.com/security/open-redirect/google-doubleclick-netadvertising-system
https://www.facebook.com/essayjeans/posts/838922772865543
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+essayjeans/posts/Y12x6gXfyFX
http://mathstopic.blogspot.com/2015/06/google-doubleclick-spam.html
http://itsecurity.lofter.com/post/1cfbf9e7_72fe79f
https://twitter.com/essayjeans/status/606726247578636288
http://tetraph.tumblr.com/post/120760676767/google-doubleclick-net-advertising-system-url
https://itinfotechnology.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/google-doubleclick-spam/
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=945171075538075
http://guyuzui.lofter.com/post/1ccdcda4_7305f25
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/23460305120155534216326/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/spamming/google-doubleclick-spam/

 

 

Paypal Online Website OAuth 2.0 Covert Redirect (OpenIDconnect) Web Security Bugs (Information Leakage & Open Redirect)

paypal_big-1

 

Paypal Online Website OAuth 2.0 Covert Redirect (OpenIDconnect) Web Security Bugs (Information Leakage & Open Redirect)




(1) Domain:
paypal.com

 

“PayPal is an American worldwide online payments system. Online money transfers serve as electronic alternatives to traditional paper methods like checks and money orders. PayPal is one of the world’s largest internet payment companies.The company operates as an acquirer, performing payment processing for online vendors, auction sites and other commercial users, for which it charges a fee. Established in 1998, PayPal (NASDAQ: PYPL) had its IPO in 2002, and became a wholly owned subsidiary of eBay later that year. In 2014, PayPal moved $228 billion in 26 currencies across more than 190 nations, generating a total revenue of $7.9 billion (44% of eBay’s total profits). The same year, eBay announced plans to spin-off PayPal into an independent company the following year.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Description:

Paypal web application has a computer security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect cyber attacks. 



The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7. 

 
 

 

 

(2.1) Vulnerability Detail:

PayPal’s OAuth 2.0 system is susceptible to Attacks. More specifically, the authentication of parameter “&redirct_uri” in OAuth 2.0 system is insufficient. It can be misused to design Open Redirect Attacks to PayPal.

 

 

At the same time, it can be used to collect sensitive information of both third-party app and users by using the following parameters,

“&response_type”=code,token…

“&scope”=email,user_birthday,user_likes…

 

 

It increases the likelihood of successful Open Redirect Attacks to third-party websites, too.

 
 
 
 

 

Before acceptance of third-party application:

When a logged-in PayPal user clicks the URL ([1]) above, he/she will be asked for consent as in whether to allow a third-party website to receive his/her information. If the user clicks OK, he/she will be then redirected to the URL assigned to the parameter “&redirect_uri”.

 

If a user has not logged onto PayPal and clicks the URL ([1]) above, the same situation will happen upon login.

 
 

 

After acceptance of third-party application:

A logged-in PayPal user would no longer be asked for consent and could be redirected to a webpage controlled by the attacker when he/she clicks the URL ([1]).

 

For a user who has not logged in, the attack could still be completed after a pop-up page that prompts him/her to log in.

 
 
 

 

 

(2.1.1) PayPal would normally allow all the URLs that belong to the domain of an authorized third-party website. However, these URLs could be prone to manipulation. For example, the “&redirect_uri” parameter in the URLs is supposed to be set by the third-party websites, but an attacker could change its value to make Attacks. 

 

 

Hence, a user could be redirected from PayPal to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site unwillingly. This is as if the user is redirected from PayPal directly. The number of PayPal’s OAuth 2.0 client websites is so huge that such Attacks could be commonplace.

 

 

Before acceptance of the third-party application, PayPal’s OAuth 2.0 system makes the redirects appear more trustworthy and could potentially increase the likelihood of successful Open Redirect Attacks of third-party website.

 

 

Once the user accepts the application, the attackers could completely bypass PayPal’s authentication system and attack more easily.

 

 

It might be of PayPal’s interest to patch up against such attacks. 

 
 
 

 

 

 

(2.2) Used one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage is “http://essayjeanslike.lofter.com/“. Can suppose it is malicious and contains code that collect sensitive information of both third-party app and users.

 

 

Below is an example of a vulnerable third-party domain:
constantcontact.com

 
 
 
 
 



POC Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVtLA1YzIBs


Blog Detail:
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/05/paypal-oauth-20-openidconnect-covert.html





(3) What is Covert Redirect? 

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS (Cross-site Scripting) vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect can work together with CSRF (Cross-site Request Forgery) as well. After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196.  X-Force reference number is 93031.

 
 
 
 



 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. 
(@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/









Related Articles:
http://tetraph.com/security/covert-redirect/paypal-oauth-2-0-openidconnect-covert-redirect-vulnerability/
http://ithut.tumblr.com/post/119493112323/securitypost-sicherheitslucke-in-oauth-2-0-und
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/559164333721001984
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/covert-redirect/paypal-oauth-2-0-openidconnect-covert-redirect-vulnerability/
http://computerobsess.blogspot.sg/2014/05/paypal-bug.html
https://hackertopic.wordpress.com/2014/05/01/paypal-covert-redirect/
http://ittechnology.lofter.com/post/1cfbf60d_72e61e0
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/05/paypal-bug.html
http://blog.163.com/tetraph/blog/static/23460305120144612635422
https://webtechwire.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/paypal-covert-redirect/