Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Web Security Problem

Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Web Security Problem

Website Description:
“The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust. First published in 1896 by Lord Northcliffe, it is the United Kingdom’s second biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982. Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. The Daily Mail was Britain’s first daily newspaper aimed at the newly-literate “lower-middle class market resulting from mass education, combining a low retail price with plenty of competitions, prizes and promotional gimmicks”, and was the first British paper to sell a million copies a day. It was at the outset a newspaper for women, the first to provide features especially for them, and as of the second-half of 2013 had a 54.77% female readership, the only British newspaper whose female readers constitute more than 50% of its demographic. It had an average daily circulation of 1,708,006 copies in March 2014. Between July and December 2013 it had an average daily readership of approximately 3.951 million, of whom approximately 2.503 million were in the ABC1 demographic and 1.448 million in the C2DE demographic. Its website has more than 100 million unique visitors per month.” (Wikipedia)

One of its website’s Alexa rank is 93 on January 01 2015. The website is one of the most popular websites in the United Kingdom.

(1) Vulnerability Description:
Daily online websites have a cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Open Redirect (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards) attacks. During the tests, all Daily mail websites (Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday & Metro media group) use the same mechanism. These websites include dailymail.co.uk, thisismoney.co.uk, and mailonsunday.co.uk.

Google Dork:
“Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group”

The vulnerability occurs at “&targetUrl” parameter in “logout.html?” page, i.e.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fgoogle.com

dailymail_1

 

thisismoney_1

(2.1) Use the following tests to illustrate the scenario painted above.
The redirected webpage address is “http://diebiyi.com/articles“. Can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

Vulnerable URLs:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fdailymail.co.uk
http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fhao123.com/
http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fpinterest.com

POC Code:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fdiebiyi.com/articles
http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fdiebiyi.com/articles
http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fdiebiyi.com/articles

POC Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AU-HJGe5BWE&feature=youtu.be

Blog Detail:
http://tetraph.com/security/website-test/daily-mail-url-redirection/
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2015/10/daily-mail-registration-page.html
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2015/10/30/daily-mail-open-redirect/

(2.2) The program code flaw can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (9 9.0.8112.16421) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (37.0.2) & Google Chromium 42.0.2311 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04.2),and Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X v10.9 Mavericks.

These bugs were found by using URFDS (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Detection System).

(2) Description of Open Redirect:
Here is the description of Open Redirect: “A web application accepts a user-controlled input that specifies a link to an external site, and uses that link in a Redirect. This simplifies phishing attacks. An http parameter may contain a URL value and could cause the web application to redirect the request to the specified URL. By modifying the URL value to a malicious site, an attacker may successfully launch a phishing scam and steal user credentials. Because the server name in the modified link is identical to the original site, phishing attempts have a more trustworthy appearance.” (From CWE)

(3) Vulnerability Disclosure:
These vulnerabilities have not been patched.

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

 

 

 

 

Reference:
https://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2015110028
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2015/11/daily-mail-open-redirect.html
http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/post/132726134291/ithut-daily-mail-registration-page-unvalidated
http://itsecurity.lofter.com/post/1cfbf9e7_8d45d37
https://inzeed.wordpress.com/2015/11/07/daily-mail-registration-page
http://webtechhut.blogspot.com/2015/11/daily-mail-registration-page.html
https://community.webroot.com/t5/Security-Industry-News/The-Telegraph-and-Daily-Mail
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/2643|
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2015/11/03/8

 

Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards & XSS Web Security Problem

Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards & XSS Web Security Problem

 

Website Description:
“The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust. First published in 1896 by Lord Northcliffe, it is the United Kingdom’s second biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982. Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. The Daily Mail was Britain’s first daily newspaper aimed at the newly-literate “lower-middle class market resulting from mass education, combining a low retail price with plenty of competitions, prizes and promotional gimmicks”, and was the first British paper to sell a million copies a day. It was at the outset a newspaper for women, the first to provide features especially for them, and as of the second-half of 2013 had a 54.77% female readership, the only British newspaper whose female readers constitute more than 50% of its demographic. It had an average daily circulation of 1,708,006 copies in March 2014. Between July and December 2013 it had an average daily readership of approximately 3.951 million, of whom approximately 2.503 million were in the ABC1 demographic and 1.448 million in the C2DE demographic. Its website has more than 100 million unique visitors per month.” (Wikipedia)

One of its website’s Alexa rank is 93 on January 01 2015. The website is one of the most popular websites in the United Kingdom.

The Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards problem has not been patched, while the XSS problem has been patched.

 

 

 

(1) Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Web Security Problem

 

(1.1) Vulnerability Description:
Daily online websites have a cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Open Redirect (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards) attacks. During the tests, all Daily mail websites (Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday & Metro media group) use the same mechanism. These websites include dailymail.co.uk, thisismoney.co.uk, and mailonsunday.co.uk.

 

 

dailymail_1

thisismoney_1

 

 

 

Google Dork:
“Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group”

 

 

The vulnerability occurs at “&targetUrl” parameter in “logout.html?” page, i.e.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fgoogle.com

 

 

 

(1.2.1) Use the following tests to illustrate the scenario painted above.

The redirected webpage address is “http://diebiyi.com/articles“. Can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

 

 

(1.2.2) The program code flaw can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (9 9.0.8112.16421) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (37.0.2) & Google Chromium 42.0.2311 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04.2),and Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X v10.9 Mavericks.

These bugs were found by using URFDS (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Detection System).

 

 

 

(1.2) Description of Open Redirect:
Here is the description of Open Redirect: “A web application accepts a user-controlled input that specifies a link to an external site, and uses that link in a Redirect. This simplifies phishing attacks. An http parameter may contain a URL value and could cause the web application to redirect the request to the specified URL. By modifying the URL value to a malicious site, an attacker may successfully launch a phishing scam and steal user credentials. Because the server name in the modified link is identical to the original site, phishing attempts have a more trustworthy appearance.” (From CWE)

 

 

 

(1.3) Vulnerability Disclosure:
These vulnerabilities have not been patched.

 

 

 

 

(2) Daily Mail Website XSS Cyber Security Zero-Day Vulnerability

(2.1) Vulnerability description:
DailyMail has a security problem. Criminals can exploit it by XSS attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “reportAbuseInComment.html?” page with “&commentId” parameter, i.e.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/reportAbuseInComment.html?articleId=346288&commentId=877038

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Mozilla Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and Microsoft IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.

dailymail_uk_xss




(2.2) What is XSS?
“Cross-site scripting (XSS) is a type of computer security vulnerability typically found in web applications. XSS enables attackers to inject client-side script into web pages viewed by other users. A cross-site scripting vulnerability may be used by attackers to bypass access controls such as the same-origin policy. Cross-site scripting carried out on websites accounted for roughly 84% of all security vulnerabilities documented by Symantec as of 2007. Their effect may range from a petty nuisance to a significant security risk, depending on the sensitivity of the data handled by the vulnerable site and the nature of any security mitigation implemented by the site’s owner.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

(2.3) Vulnerability Disclosure:
This vulnerability has been patched.

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

 

 

 

 

TeleGraph All Photo (Picture) Pages Have Been Vulnerable to XSS Cyber Attacks

Website Description:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk

 

“The Daily Telegraph is a British daily morning English-language broadsheet newspaper, published in London by Telegraph Media Group and distributed throughout the United Kingdom and internationally. The newspaper was founded by Arthur B. Sleigh in June 1855 as The Daily Telegraph and Courier, and since 2004 has been owned by David and Frederick Barclay. It had a daily circulation of 523,048 in March 2014, down from 552,065 in early 2013. In comparison, The Times had an average daily circulation of 400,060, down to 394,448. The Daily Telegraph has a sister paper, The Sunday Telegraph, that was started in 1961, which had circulation of 418,670 as of March 2014. The two printed papers currently are run separately with different editorial staff, but there is cross-usage of stories. News articles published in either, plus online Telegraph articles, may also be published on the Telegraph Media Group’s http://www.telegraph.co.uk website, all under The Telegraph title.” (From Wikipedia)

 

 

 

(1) Vulnerability Description:

Telegraph has a Web security bug problem. It is vulnerable to XSS attacks. In fact, all its photo pages are vulnerable to XSS (Cross-Site Scripting) vulnerabilities. Telegraph’s picture pages use “&frame” as its parameter. All its web pages use “&frame” are vulnerable to the bugs. Those vulnerabilities have been patched now.

 

 

Examples of Vulnerable Links:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/10663967/The-worlds-most-spectacular-theatres.html?frame=2836095

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/investmentinproperty/10609314/For-sale-top-20-properties-ripe-for-investment.html?frame=2808162

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinkpicturegalleries/9737226/Elephant-dung-coffee-Black-Ivory-beans-passed-through-the-animals-guts.html?frame=2424280

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/9487434/Graduate-jobs-Best-languages-to-study.html?frame=2314790

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/picturegalleries/10782171/The-20-best-cars-to-own-in-2014.html?frame=2890278

 

 

POC Code:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/10663967/The-worlds-most-spectacular-theatres.html?frame=2836095″><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/investmentinproperty/10609314/For-sale-top-20-properties-ripe-for-investment.html?frame=2808162″><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinkpicturegalleries/9737226/Elephant-dung-coffee-Black-Ivory-beans-passed-through-the-animals-guts.html?frame=2424280″><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/9487434/Graduate-jobs-Best-languages-to-study.html?frame=2314790″><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/picturegalleries/10782171/The-20-best-cars-to-own-in-2014.html?frame=2890278″><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (37.02) in Ubuntu (14.04) and IE (8.0. 7601) in Windows 7. The bugs found by using CSXDS.

 

 

 

telegraph_frame_xss2

telegraph_frame_xss3

telegraph_frame_xss4









(2) XSS Description:

The description of XSS is: “Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) attacks are a type of injection, in which malicious scripts are injected into otherwise benign and trusted web sites. XSS attacks occur when an attacker uses a web application to send malicious code, generally in the form of a browser side script, to a different end user. Flaws that allow these attacks to succeed are quite widespread and occur anywhere a web application uses input from a user within the output it generates without validating or encoding it.” (OWSAP)

 

Poc Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqjlabJ1OzA&feature=youtu.be

 

Blog Details:
http://www.tetraph.com/security/website-test/telegraph-xss/
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2015/10/telegraph-xss-0day.html
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2015/10/30/telegraph-bug/

 

 

 

(3) Vulnerability Disclosure:

Those vulnerabilities are patched now.

 

 

 

Discoved and Disclosured By:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

 

 

 

 

 

References:
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2015/11/03/7
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/2642
http://russiapost.blogspot.com/2015/11/telegraph-xss.html
https://itinfotechnology.wordpress.com/2015/11/01/telegraph-xss/
https://www.mail-archive.com/fulldisclosure%40seclists.org/msg02682.html
https://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2015110023
http://marc.info/?l=full-disclosure&m=144651821527165&w=4
http://germancast.blogspot.com/2015/11/telegraph-xss.html
http://itsecurity.lofter.com/post/1cfbf9e7_8d3ea9e
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/132723700196/telegraph-xss
https://itswift.wordpress.com/2015/11/02/telegraph-xss/
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2015/Nov/4

 

Daily Mail Online Website XSS Cyber Security Zero-Day Vulnerability

Daily Mail Online Website XSS Cyber Security Zero-Day Vulnerability



Website Description:
“The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust. First published in 1896 by Lord Northcliffe, it is the United Kingdom’s second biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982. Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. The Daily Mail was Britain’s first daily newspaper aimed at the newly-literate “lower-middle class market resulting from mass education, combining a low retail price with plenty of competitions, prizes and promotional gimmicks”, and was the first British paper to sell a million copies a day. It was at the outset a newspaper for women, the first to provide features especially for them, and as of the second-half of 2013 had a 54.77% female readership, the only British newspaper whose female readers constitute more than 50% of its demographic. It had an average daily circulation of 1,708,006 copies in March 2014. Between July and December 2013 it had an average daily readership of approximately 3.951 million, of whom approximately 2.503 million were in the ABC1 demographic and 1.448 million in the C2DE demographic. Its website has more than 100 million unique visitors per month.” (Wikipedia)

 

Domain Name:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

The Alexa rank of it is 93 on January 01 2015. It is one of the most popular websites in the United Kingdom.

 

dailymail_uk_xss

 

(1) Vulnerability description:

Daily Mail has a security problem. Criminals can exploit it by XSS attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “reportAbuseInComment.html?” page with “&commentId” parameter, i.e.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/reportAbuseInComment.html?articleId=346288&commentId=877038

 

 

POC Code:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/reportAbuseInComment.html?articleId=346288&commentId=”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

The vulnerability can be attacked without user log in. Tests were performed on Mozilla Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and Microsoft IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.

 

Poc Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oig-ZrlJDf8&feature=youtu.be

 

Blog Detail:
http://tetraph.com/security/web-security/daily-mail-xss-bug/
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2015/10/daily-mail-online-website-xss-cyber.html
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2015/10/30/daily-mail-xss/

 

(2) What is XSS?

“Cross-site scripting (XSS) is a type of computer security vulnerability typically found in web applications. XSS enables attackers to inject client-side script into web pages viewed by other users. A cross-site scripting vulnerability may be used by attackers to bypass access controls such as the same-origin policy. Cross-site scripting carried out on websites accounted for roughly 84% of all security vulnerabilities documented by Symantec as of 2007. Their effect may range from a petty nuisance to a significant security risk, depending on the sensitivity of the data handled by the vulnerable site and the nature of any security mitigation implemented by the site’s owner.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

(3) Vulnerability Disclosure:

This vulnerability has been patched.

 

 

 

Discoved and Disclosured By:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference:
https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/134189/Daily-Mail-Unvalidated-Redirect
http://news.softpedia.com/news/the-telegraph-and-daily-mail-fix-xss
https://www.secnews.gr/dailymail_open_redirect_bug
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/132726489926/daily-mail-xss
http://sys-secure.es/daily-mail-registration-page-unvalidated
http://itsecuritynews.info/tag/jing-wang/
http://itsecurity.lofter.com/post/1cfbf9e7_8d45d6b
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2015/11/daily-mail-xss.html
https://computertechhut.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/daily-mail-xss/
http://marc.info/?l=full-disclosure&m=144651836427184&w=4

eBay Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

ebay-logo

eBay Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

(1) WebSite:
ebay.com



“eBay Inc. (stylized as ebay, formerly eBay) is an American multinational corporation and e-commerce company, providing consumer to consumer & business to consumer sales services via Internet. It is headquartered in San Jose, California. eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar in 1995, and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, it is a multi-billion dollar business with operations localized in over thirty countries.

 

The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a broad variety of goods and services worldwide. In addition to its auction-style sales, the website has since expanded to include “Buy It Now” shopping; shopping by UPC, ISBN, or other kind of SKU (via Half.com); online classified advertisements (via Kijiji or eBay Classifieds); online event ticket trading (via StubHub); online money transfers (via PayPal) and other services.” (Wikipedia)

 



(2) Vulnerability Description:

eBay web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “ebay.com/rover” page with “&mpre” parameter, i.e.

http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-67261-24966-0/2?mtid=691&kwid=1&crlp=1_263602&itemid=370825182102&mpre=http://www.google.com

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (26.0) in Ubuntu (12.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.


 

 

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from eBay to another site, eBay will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in eBay’s whitelist, e.g.
google.com

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from eBay to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from eBay directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
http://googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad system)

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

Poc Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4H-u17Y9ks

 

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/ebay-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



 

 



(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

Google Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

go

 

Bypass Google Open Redirect Filter Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

— Google Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

 

 

 

(1) WebSite:
google.com

 

“Google is an American multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software. Most of its profits are derived from AdWords, an online advertising service that places advertising near the list of search results.

 

The corporation has been estimated to run more than one million servers in data centers around the world (as of 2007). It processes over one billion search requests and about 24 petabytes of user-generated data each day (as of 2009). In December 2013, Alexa listed google.com as the most visited website in the world. Numerous Google sites in other languages figure in the top one hundred, as do several other Google-owned sites such as YouTube and Blogger. Its market dominance has led to prominent media coverage, including criticism of the company over issues such as search neutrality, copyright, censorship, and privacy.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Description:

Google web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.

The vulnerability exists at “Logout?” page with “&continue” parameter, i.e.


The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from Google to another site, Google will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in Google’s whitelist (The whitelist usually contains websites belong to Google), e.g.
docs.google.com
googleads.g.doubleclick.net

 

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Google to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Google directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad System)

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one webpage for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on.html

 

 

 

 

 

(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

 

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/11/google-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/29
http://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2014110106
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/23460305120141145350181/
https://infoswift.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/google-web-security/
http://tetraph.tumblr.com/post/119490394042/securitypost#notes
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on.html
http://webtech.lofter.com/post/1cd3e0d3_706af10
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/559165319575371776
http://tetraph.com/security/covert-redirect/google-based-on-googleads-g-doubleclick-net/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-security/google-covert-g-doubleclick-net/
https://hackertopic.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/google-web-security/

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Google Covert Redirect Vulnerability Base Googleads.g.doubleclick.net – Bypass Open Redirect Filters

The Weather Channel at Least 76.3% Links Vulnerable to XSS Attacks

 
 

GTY_email_hacker_dm_130718_16x9_608

 

The Weather Channel at Least 76.3% Links Vulnerable to XSS Attacks

 

 

Domain Description:
http://www.weather.com/

 

“The Weather Channel is an American basic cable and satellite television channel which broadcasts weather forecasts and weather-related news and analyses, along with documentaries and entertainment programming related to weather. Launched on May 2, 1982, the channel broadcasts weather forecasts and weather-related news and analysis, along with documentaries and entertainment programming related to weather.”

 

“As of February 2015, The Weather Channel was received by approximately 97.3 million American households that subscribe to a pay television service (83.6% of U.S. households with at least one television set), which gave it the highest national distribution of any U.S. cable channel. However, it was subsequently dropped by Verizon FiOS (losing its approximately 5.5 millions subscribers), giving the title of most distributed network to HLN. Actual viewership of the channel averaged 210,000 during 2013 and has been declining for several years. Content from The Weather Channel is available for purchase from the NBCUniversal Archives.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

Vulnerability description:


The Weather Channel has a cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by XSS bugs.

 

Almost all links under the domain weather.com are vulnerable to XSS attacks. Attackers just need to add script at the end of The Weather Channel’s URLs. Then the scripts will be executed.

 

10 thousands of Links were tested based a self-written tool. During the tests, 76.3% of links belong to weather.com were vulnerable to XSS attacks.

 

The reason of this vulnerability is that Weather Channel uses URLs to construct its HTML tags without filtering malicious script codes.

 

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 8.

 

 

 

 

weather_1_xss

 
 

weather_2_xx

 

 

POC Codes, e.g.

http://www.weather.com/slideshows/main/“–/>”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.weather.com/home-garden/home/white-house-lawns-20140316%22–/“–/>”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>t%28%27justqdjing%27%29%3E

http://www.weather.com/news/main/“><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

 

 

The Weather Channel has patched this Vulnerability in late November, 2014 (last Week). “The Full Disclosure mailing list is a public forum for detailed discussion of vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques, as well as tools, papers, news, and events of interest to the community. FD differs from other security lists in its open nature and support for researchers’ right to decide how to disclose their own discovered bugs. The full disclosure movement has been credited with forcing vendors to better secure their products and to publicly acknowledge and fix flaws rather than hide them. Vendor legal intimidation and censorship attempts are not tolerated here!” A great many of the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. This bug was published at The Full Disclosure in November, 2014.

 

 

 

Discovered by:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/89
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2014/11/27/3
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1253
https://progressive-comp.com/?l=full-disclosure&m=141705578527909&w=1
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/104313615841/the-weather-channel-flaw
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/xss-vulnerability/the-weather-channel-exploit
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/the-weather-channel-bug
http://whitehatpost.lofter.com/post/1cc773c8_6f2d4a8
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-weather-channel-flaw
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/234603051201411475314523/
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-weather-channel-xss.html
http://ithut.tumblr.com/post/121916595448/weather-channel-xss
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-weather-channel-weather-bug
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-weather-channel-xss.html
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/xss-vulnerability/the-weather-channel-bug